Devil Dog Firearm Training

Devil Dogs: The German Army coined this term of respect for U.S. Marines during World War I. In the summer of 1918 the German Army was driving toward Paris. The French Army was in full retreat. In a desperate effort to save Paris, the newly arrived U.S. Marines were thrown into the breach. In June 1918, in bitter fighting lasting for weeks, Marines repeatedly repulsed the Germans in Belleau Wood. The German drive toward Paris sputtered, fizzled, and died. Then the Marines attacked and swept the Germans back out of Belleau Wood. Paris had been saved. The tide of war had turned. Five months later Germany would be forced to accept an armistice. The battle tenacity and fury of the U.S. Marines had stunned the Germans. In their official reports they called the Marines "teufel hunden," meaning Devil Dog, the ferocious mountain dogs of Bavarian folklore.


Chief Instructors Background


*US Marine Corps Veteran 2nd Marine Division 

---United States Marine Corps ground combat element of the 2nd Marine Expeditionary Force---

*NRA Certified Instructor

*NRA Basic Pistol Certified

*NRA Personal Protection in the Home Certified

*Alumni of the University of Detroit Mercy; Legal Administration - Magna Cum Laude

*Alumni of the University of Michigan; Master of Public Administration

*Educator and Paralegal


What We Teach Includes


We teach differently from other firearm safety programs. Before we train on the range we practice shooting positions and proper form with rubber training pistols. On the range we add snap caps; non-firing trainer dummy rounds, to live magazines. This exercise allows students to experience malfunctions like misfires and correct them during live fire exercises. Additionally we teach the following:


*How to properly disclose to law enforcement you're armed

*Factors to consider when choosing your firearm

*How to legally transport firearms 

*Differences of open carry and concealed carry

*Common errors and how to avoid them

*Safety rules and procedures for safe gun handling

*Ammunition types and clearing malfunctions

*The 5 Shooting fundamentals

*Cleaning and storage

*Shooting positions


How We Teach


We maintain a practical curriculum for maximum effectiveness. Keeping it simple we teach through observation, understanding, and action; seeing, thinking, and doing.  An effective training program puts emphasis on these three ways of learning:


1. Observation: encouraging students to look at things closely and fearlessly,

and to ask searching questions.

2. Understanding: helping students learn to analyze problems critically and work

together toward finding appropriate solutions.

3. Action: students and instructors learn together through experience and practice.


Unfortunately, many training programs do little to encourage students to think. They focus on memorizing facts and carrying out specific instructions. Even standard teaching aids tend to demonstrate information rather than help students discover answers for themselves by learning how to use the material. Without this step students learn to follow directions or flow charts step by step, without having to think or make decisions. Their training is oriented toward performing tasks rather than solving problems.


 What you hear, you forget; what you see, you remember; what you do, you understand.